Research & Education

The MSc in Multilingual Computing and Localisation (Distance Learning) was a taught programme delivered online and students may opt to complete it in one or two years. It was aimed specifically at students who already have a background in either localisation, computing, language technology, translation or related disciplines. It guided students in their research of the underlying issues in localisation, with an emphasis on technical and business aspects. Students were encouraged to spend some time studying at one of UL's partner universities and work closely with industrial mentors on relevant research projects.

The MSc in Multilingual Computing and Localisation (Distance Learning) was offered by the Localisation Research Centre (LRC) at the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems (CSIS) at the University of Limerick (UL), Ireland. It was the world's first dedicated postgraduate programme in multilingual computing and localisation and built on UL's world-leading expertise in localisation teaching and research since 1997.

This state-of-the-art programme was developed with the collaboration of experts from industry, academia and national agencies with content that reflected the changing needs of society, industry and students.

The MSc in Multilingual Computing and Localisation (Distance Learning) was aimed specifically at professionals and students who already have a background in localisation, computing, language technology, translation or related disciplines. It guided students in their research of the underlying issues in localisation, with an emphasis on technical and business aspects. Students were encouraged to spend some time studying at one of UL's partner universities, governmental and intergovernmental organizations and work closely with industrial mentors on relevant research projects.

The programme, uniquely, also addressed the role of localisation in human development, poverty relief, healthcare, justice and the environment. Working closely with The Rosetta Foundation, students gained highly valuable hands-on experience with real-life state-of-the-art localisation and translation tools and processes.

On successful completion of the MSc in Multilingual Computing and Localisation (Distance Learning), students were qualified to describe the requirements for software and content localisation that could be applied anywhere throughout the world in the fast growing, US$30 billion localisation and translation service industry. They were able to handle and assess state-of-the-art localisation strategies, the latest standards, tools and technologies and developed a solid foundation in computer programming. They were also be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of how internationalisation moves localisation up the value chain. Knowledge and skills learned at UL  enabled graduates to work with translators, programmers, project managers and QA experts around the world to deliver information that can change lives, work on the newest video games or enable access to the latest social networks in the world.